GMAT - About the Test

Taken directly from, the format of the GMAT test is described below.

Earlier, ie till December 2005, the test was conducted by ETS, but now Pearson. The format has not changed much, only the break given between the sections has changed from 5 minutes to 10 minutes. Also, registering and navigating on the site has become easier. Here goes the format of the test:

GMAT Overview

The Graduate Management Admission Test® (GMAT®) is a standardized assessment—delivered in English—that helps business schools assess the qualifications of applicants for advanced study in business and management. Schools use the test as one predictor of academic performance in an MBA program or in other graduate management programs.

What the GMAT® Measures

The GMAT® exam measures basic verbal, mathematical, and analytical writing skills that you have developed over a long period of time in your education and work. It does NOT measure:

  • your knowledge of business,
  • your job skills,
  • specific content in your undergraduate or first university course work,
  • your abilities in any other specific subject area, or
  • subjective qualities—such as motivation, creativity, and interpersonal skills.

Format and Timing

The GMAT® exam consists of three main parts, the Analytical Writing Assessment, the Quantitative section, and the Verbal section.

Analytical Writing Assessment

The GMAT® exam begins with the Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA). The AWA consists of two separate writing tasks—Analysis of an Issue and Analysis of an Argument. You are allowed 30 minutes to complete each one.

Quantitative Section

Following an optional ten-minute break, you begin the Quantitative Section of the GMAT® exam. This section contains 37 multiple-choice questions of two question types—Data Sufficiency and Problem Solving. You will be allowed a maximum of 75 minutes to complete the entire section.

Verbal Section

After a second optional ten-minute break, you begin the Verbal Section of the GMAT® exam. This section contains 41 multiple choice questions of three question types—Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and Sentence Correction. You are allowed a maximum of 75 minutes to complete the entire section.


preeti said...

Nice post. This year GMAC has introduced a newer Integrated reasoning section.

GMAT Critical reasoning